BASS Strait passenger ferry Spirit of Tasmania I has returned to service after maintenance and improvements designed to improve fuel consumption and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

 


Uunderwater (sic) paint coatings were removed during the three-week dry docking in Sydney and replaced with a smooth silicon paint designed to deliver a significant annual reduction in fuel use.

 

Other work included inspection and maintenance of main engines, stabilizers and machinery.

 


Infrastructure Minister Graeme Sturges said public areas of the ferry had been improved and renovated down to fixing single tiles that had lifted in bathrooms.

 

 

“In addition, state-of-the-art navigation equipment has been installed on the bridge to improve the navigational aids for the captains and deck officers.

 


“Public deck refurbishments included upgrades to the Deck 10 passenger area with a new coating on the roof, providing greater comfort and climate control for passengers.”

 


Mr Sturges said Tasmanian-made carpet, manufactured at Tascot Templeton in Devonport, had been laid in the gaming lounge, Lattetude bar, pursers (sic) area and a la carte restaurant.

 


“Tasmanian suppliers and contractors spent two weeks laying carpets, fitting new lights, hanging pictures and window furnishings and upholstering furniture.”

 


Spirit of Tasmania II had similar work completed last year.

 

Jarvis thought that spiel sounded familiar, and surprise - the following press release was issued by the honourable Sturgo the same day:

 

`` Spirit of Tasmania I is back in service tonight having undergone extensive work in dry dock which will see savings in fuel costs and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.


Minister for Infrastructure, Graeme Sturges, said underwater paint coatings had been removed and replaced with a smooth silicon paint designed to deliver a significant annual reduction in fuel use.

The three-week scheduled dry docking of Spirit of Tasmania I also allowed TT Line to undertake extensive external cleaning and mechanical upgrades.

“Passengers travelling on Spirit I from today do so knowing that the crossing will have significantly less impact on the environment,” Mr Sturges said.

“Hundreds of individual jobs were undertaken while the ship was in dry dock”.

“Inspection and maintenance of main engines, stabilizers and other machinery components was undertaken to maintain the operational reliability of the ship’s major equipment, delivering a high standard of safety for all passengers.

“These included checking and overhauling the sea valves, anodes that protect the steel, maintenance on thrusters and engines that can only be done out of the water and measuring wear down on anchor cables.”

“Much of this work won’t be seen by passengers but the public areas have not been overlooked, right down to fixing single tiles that have lifted in bathrooms.”

“In addition, state-of-the-art navigation equipment has been installed on the bridge to improve the navigational aids for the captains and deck officers.”

“Public deck refurbishments included upgrades to the Deck 10 passenger area with a new coating on the roof, providing greater comfort and climate control for passengers.”

Mr Sturges said Tasmanian-made carpet, manufactured at Tascot Templeton in Devonport, had been laid in the gaming lounge, Lattetude bar, purser’s area and a la carte restaurant.

“Tasmanian suppliers and contractors spent two weeks laying carpets, fitting new lights, hanging pictures and window furnishings and upholstering furniture.”

“These upgrades, and similar work already completed on Sprit II provide not only a significant boost to cutting greenhouse gas emissions but also improve passenger comfort and put money into the Tasmanian economy.

“I commend TT Line and its management for continuing to improve the performance of the Spirits and its support of Tasmanian workers,” Mr Sturges said.

At least The Examiner can’t be accused of simply cutting and pasting a Government media release and presenting the result as news.  After all, a few words were changed, and even a couple of spelling mistakes were added.  Very slick work.

I would have though discerning readers might be more interested in how TT Line was performing, given their dismal efforts in providing a return to taxpayers over the last decade. 

But that’s clearly not The Examiner’s style.

Why pay for a newspaper?  Why doesn’t someone just collate the various media releases issued over the course of a working day, and email them to readers free?

Oh, I forgot.  We wouldn’t get to read the ads then.

  Jarvis

 

JARVIS COCKER
Lovers of quality journalism will no doubt appreciate the following story posted on The Examiner online …